Williamson Gallery Art/Science Exhibitions | Image Group





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Exhibition: Hyperbolic: Reefs, Rubbish and Reason (2011)

The Cold Water Reef, by the IFF Core Reef Crafters. Photo credit: The Institute for Figuring (IFF).

Created by science writer Margaret Wertheim and her twin sister Christine, Hyperbolic: Reefs, Rubbish and Reason featured crocheted coral facsimiles based upon hyperbolic geometry and served as a meditation on the mystery of mathematics, the evolution of life, the well-spring of human creativity, and the environmental crisis confronting marine ecosystems everywhere. The exhibition was re-designed and expanded for the Williamson Gallery presentation, after appearing at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History.



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Exhibition: In the Dermisphere (2007)

Installation View, contemporary art and the science of skin. Photo credit: Steven A. Heller/Art Center College of Design.

In the Dermisphere included works of art by Aziz + Cucher, Kent Anderson Butler, Carlee Fernandez, Tom Knechtel, Peter Liashkov, Bruce Nauman, Pat York; artifacts from the collections of the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles, and the Huntington Library; and a catalog essay by Nobel Laureate biologist David Baltimore. Through objects of art and natural history, the exhibition focused on skin's biological nature — at the same time questioning the processes by which humans embed social meaning in parts of their biology that have non-social functions and origins.



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Exhibition: OBSERVE (2008)

Lita Albuquerque, Stellar Suspension, 2008. Photo credit: Steven A. Heller/Art Center College of Design.

The exhibition OBSERVE included five contemporary artists that were invited to consult and collaborate with scientists at Caltech's Spitzer Science Center, home of the infrared sun-orbiting NASA Spitzer Space Telescope. The artists' installations in the Williamson Gallery were inspired by conversations surrounding the practice, discoveries, theories, and speculations of deep-space astronomy. The exhibition was accompanied by a 75-page illustrated catalogue with essays.



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Exhibition: ENERGY (2010)

SUN, 2007. From ENERGY (2010) Sun image credit: Solar System Visualization Project, NASA/JPL-Goddard. Photo credit: Steven A. Heller/Art Center College of Design.

The exhibition ENERGY looked at how natural forces shape not only material things, but impact our emotions and intellect as well. The exhibition included works by contemporary artists, mixed with artifacts borrowed from: the Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, Caltech; The Huntington Library; NASA/JPL/Goddard Solar System Visualization Project; DAWN space mission, JPL/Caltech; Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, UCLA. The installation photo shows a rear-screen projection of 1-year sun rotation.






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Exhibition: ENERGY (2010)

Rebeca Mèndez, At Any Given Moment, Fall 1, with Volcanic Rock, 2009. Video projection and installation. Photo credit: Steven A. Heller/Art Center College of Design.

The exhibition ENERGY looked at how natural forces shape not only material things, but impact our emotions and intellect as well. The exhibition included works by contemporary artists, mixed with artifacts borrowed from: the Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, Caltech; The Huntington Library; NASA/JPL/Goddard Solar System Visualization Project; DAWN space mission, JPL/Caltech; Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, UCLA.



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Exhibition: ENERGY (2010)

John Smeaton, Experimental Enquiry, 1794. Courtesy of The Huntington Library, San Marino, California.

The exhibition ENERGY looked at how natural forces shape not only material things, but impact our emotions and intellect as well. The exhibition included works by contemporary artists, mixed with artifacts borrowed from: the Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, Caltech; The Huntington Library; NASA/JPL/Goddard Solar System Visualization Project; DAWN space mission, JPL/Caltech; Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, UCLA.



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Exhibition: TOOLS (2009)

Gail Wight, Meaning of Miniscule, 2007 (foreground). Photo credit: Steven A. Heller/Art Center College of Design.

Utilizing objects borrowed from artists as well as local collections of contemporary art, and institutions as unique as the Autry National Center of the American West and the Carnegie Institution for Science, TOOLS defined a tool as anything that extends human biology — be it a stone, club, axe, bicycle, or Mars rover. The exhibition explored what can happen to our understanding of objects when lines of demarcation are blurred -- when generalizations are tweaked or outright ignored, and when art and artifacts from different domains are placed side by side in unusual re-contextualization.



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Exhibition: NEURO (2003)

Ken Goldberg, Pietro Perona, Infiltrate. Photo credit: Steven A. Heller/Art Center College of Design.

Infiltrate was a tank of five Koi fish, surrounded by custom tracking electronics that synthesized and projected the visual perspective of one of the fish, in real time, and allowed spectators to view the tank (and nature) from the inside looking out. NEURO brought together six contemporary artists with the knowledge and technology resources of the Center for Neuromorphic Systems Engineering (CNSE), at Caltech. CNSE studies how biological organisms sense and make sense of the world, and designs smart machines. Five of the resulting art installations debuted at the Williamson Gallery, and one at Caltech. The exhibition was accompanied by a 60-page illustrated catalogue with essays.






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Exhibition: Mathematica: A World of Numbers and Beyond (2000)

Re-assembled for Williamson Gallery exhibition, courtesy of California Science Center and Eames Demitrios. Photo credit: Steven A. Heller/Art Center College of Design.

Charles & Ray Eames' Mathematica: A World of Numbers and Beyond, 1961, was sponsored by the IBM Corporation for the California Museum of Science and Industry (now the California Science Center), where it remained on display until 1998. In 2000 it was reassembled in the Williamson Gallery, July 30 — October 1. It is now owned by and on display at the New York Hall of Science.



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Exhibition: Intimate Science (2013)

Philip Ross, Yamanakita Stool, 2006 — present.

Philip Ross's Mycotecture Series is an experiment in growing architectural structures and furniture from Ganoderma Lucidum, also known as Reishi or Ling Chi. The fungus is environmentally beneficial as well as a low cost substitutes for wood, Styrofoam and other home building products. The bricks have the feel of a composite material with a core of spongy cross grained pulp that becomes progressively denser towards its outer skin. The skin itself is incredibly hard, shatter resistant, and can handle enormous amounts of compression. Intimate Science was curated by Andrea Glover in 2012 for the Miller Gallery at Carnegie Mellon University, and traveled to the Williamson Gallery in 2013.



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Exhibition: Intimate Science (2013)

Philip Ross, Fungarch, 2006 — present.

Philip Ross's Mycotecture Series is an experiment in growing architectural structures and furniture from Ganoderma Lucidum, also known as Reishi or Ling Chi. The fungus is environmentally beneficial as well as a low cost substitutes for wood, Styrofoam and other home building products. The bricks have the feel of a composite material with a core of spongy cross grained pulp that becomes progressively denser towards its outer skin. The skin itself is incredibly hard, shatter resistant, and can handle enormous amounts of compression. Intimate Science was curated by Andrea Glover in 2012 for the Miller Gallery at Carnegie Mellon University, and traveled to the Williamson Gallery in 2013.



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Exhibition: PAGES (2012)

Page spread from Cosmographia, 1564; from PAGES exhibition (2012). Courtesy of The Huntington Library, San Marino, California.

In Peter Apian's Cosmographia of 1564, the star calculator "volvelle" (paper dial) was devised by instrument-maker Gemma Frisius. This device helped make Cosmographia a 16th-century bestseller. The PAGES exhibition looked at "the page" as a space for expressing and wrestling with ideas, and superimposed the domains of art, science, history, and literature.






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Exhibition: PAGES (2012)

Page from The Treasure Cabinet of Albertus Seba, 1734. Courtesy of The Huntington Library, San Marino, California.

Dutch pharmacist and zoologist Albertus Seba (1665-1736), produced a multi-volume record of his eighteenth century cabinet of natural history specimens, commissioning artists to illustrate his vast collection. The PAGES exhibition looked at "the page" as a space for expressing and wrestling with ideas, and superimposed the domains of art, science, history, and literature.



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Exhibition: WORLDS (2011)

Rebeca Mendez, Quagmire, 2011 (foreground); Semiconductor, Black Rain, 2009 (background - NASA STEREO spacecraft video). Photo credit: Adam Eeuwens.

The exhibition WORLDS included contemporary art, sculpture, video, sound, and large-scale installations by New York artists Richard Selesnick and Nicholas Kahn, the London artist team "semiconductor," photographer Darin Boville, and artists Jonathan Cecil, Michael C. McMillen, Rebeca Mendez, and Steve Roden, as well as data visualizations by British animator Adrian Lark, NASA HiRise Mars altimeter imagery, NASA spacecraft imagery, meteorites, vintage science fiction video, and astronomical book sketches by Galileo Galilei and Nicolaus Copernicus, drawn from the rare-book collection of the Huntington Library.



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Exhibition: WORLDS (2011)

Adrian Lark, Zumba Crater, Mars, 2010-2011
Motion visualization, using NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter HiRise and Laser Altimeter data.

For millennia astronomers have been gazing at Mars, and current humans are the first in that long history who are privileged to see it up close. This video excursion into an impact crater on Mars is an entirely data-driven view, nothing is invented. Every rock is a real rock resting on the surface of the red planet. The WORLDS exhibition explored the shift in awareness we Earth-bound humans are undergoing, as a result of discovering through science and technology both the wonders of our cosmic neighborhood and the similarities they share with our home planet.



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Exhibition: REALSPACE (2014-15)

Adam W. Brown, Robert Root-Bernstein, Origins of Life: Experiment #1.x, 2010, Lab beakers, gas canisters, chemicals, electronics, 72 x 120 in., dimensions variable. Photo credit: Rebeca Mendez.

The Origins of Life series is a working performative installation and imagining of the famous experiments carried out by Stanley Miller and Harold Urey at the University of Chicago in the 1950s. Miller-Urey set out to test the hypothesis that by recreating the atmosphere of the early Earth and adding an energy source such as lightning to the mix, the building blocks of life might appear. Within days, the experiment yielded the amino acid glycine, and within a week, alanine and urea as well.

Origins of life: Experiment #1.x is a re-imagining of Miller's experiment as an exploration of the process of emergence. Imaginary worlds are recreated with the apparatus that may mimic the primordial Earth, the moons of Jupiter and Saturn, or possibly Mars or Venus.






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Exhibition: REALSPACE (2014-15)

Dan Goods, David Delgado, Refraction, 2014. Theater light, water, custom electronics, 19 x 25 ft., dimensions variable

Refraction is the altering of the direction of a wave due to a change in its transmission medium. In the development of early telescopes, refraction played an important role and occupied the efforts of scientists such as Isaac Newton who were curious about the properties of light. The refracting telescope tamed the physics of bent light by the creation of a lens that caused its rays to converge together upon a focal point. In this exhibition's Refraction installation, the opposite happens — the beauty of untamed waves of light intersecting with rowdy waves of water are allowed their expressive chaos and feral subtleties.



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Exhibition: REALSPACE (2014-15)

Stephen Nowlin, Planets 3 & 4, 2014
Web-based looping video
Left: Bull Pasture, Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Arizona, USA, Earth. Photo: The National Park Service.
Right: Curiosity Rover at Rocknest, Mars. Photo: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS.

The exhibition REALSPACE, reflected on how science intersects with the history of how pictorial space in art changed under the influence of science. Nineteenth-century art's deconstruction of illusion in pictorial space and its ultimate relocation of aesthetic experience in real space can be viewed as a metaphor for simultaneous changes taking place in the humanities, sciences, and technology. It helped create a cultural Weltanschauung, a world view shaped by the gradual decline of supernatural theories about the world (analogous to paintings depicting things in illusory space) and the rise of scientific ones (analogous to paintings becoming objects themselves in real space). Poeticized by artists and studied by scientists throughout human history, the intractable reality of the natural world is examined by contemporary art and artifacts included in REALSPACE.



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Exhibition: UNCERTAINTY (2016)

Thomas McCauley (for the CMS Collaboration), Higgs Boson Candidate Event (8 TeV), 2012; Projected video, dimensions variable. © Courtesy/copyright CERN, for the benefit of the CMS Collaboration.

The video event was recorded with the CMS detector at the Large Hadron Collider, CERN, Switzerland, in 2012 at a proton-proton centre of mass energy of 8 TeV. The event shows characteristics expected from the decay of the Standard Model Higgs boson to a pair of Z bosons, both of which subsequently decay to a pair of electrons. The event could also be due to known standard model background processes. The exhibition puzzles over the understanding of UNCERTAINTY in science and common usage. Artifacts drawn from the domains of both art and science celebrate ambiguity as a wellspring of curiosity and the spirit of exploration, revealing the emotional dimensions of rational inquiry.



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Exhibition: UNCERTAINTY (2016)

The Einstein Collective (Christopher O'Leary), Animation for Black (W)hole, 2011 Digital animation, 12 foot diameter floor projection; Courtesy of the artist. Photo: Stephen Nowlin/ArtCenter

Black Hole Animation is a floor projection in which the viewer enters a laser field of stars and stands on the edge of a black hole accretion disk, which swirls into a supermassive black hole in Newtonian trajectories. The point of view zooms in to the edge of the black hole as a much smaller one is captured and begins to spin around the larger one. Black Hole Animation was created as part of the larger installation Black (W)hole, by The Einstein Collective, made up of artists and scientists that include: Sara Mast, lead visual artist; Jessica Jellison, architect; Christopher O'Leary, animator and visual artist; Cindy Stillwell, filmmaker; Jason Bolte, composer/sound artist; Charles Kankelborg, solar physicist; Nico Yunes, astrophysicist; Joey Shapiro Key, astrophysicist. blackwhole.montana.edu






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Exhibition: ECLIPSE (2017-18)

Entryway, ECLIPSE exhibit. Photo credit: Juan Posada/ArtCenter College of Design.

Co-curated by Stephen Nowlin (Williamson Gallery Director/Curator), Jay Pasachoff (Field Memorial Professor of Astronomy at Williams College), and Anthony Misch (Director, Lick Observatory Historical Collections Project), in association with New-York Historical Society Curator of Drawings Roberta J.M. Olson, ECLIPSE featured works of contemporary art by Lita Albuquerque, Russell Crotty, Stephen Dankner, Rosemarie Fiore, Michael C. McMillen and Jacqueline Woods, as well as historical paintings by Howard Russell Butler (1856-1934). It further included objects and artifacts borrowed or sourced from the Lick Observatory, The Huntington Library, the Museum of Jurassic Technology, Caltech Archives, JPL/NASA, Carnegie Observatories, and Goddard Space Flight Center.



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Exhibition: ECLIPSE (2017-18)

Jacqueline Woods, Black Sun with Falling Corona, 2016; Unique Gelatin Silver Print, 40 x 30 inches. Courtesy of Jacqueline Woods.

Co-curated by Stephen Nowlin (Williamson Gallery Director/Curator), Jay Pasachoff (Field Memorial Professor of Astronomy at Williams College), and Anthony Misch (Director, Lick Observatory Historical Collections Project), in association with New-York Historical Society Curator of Drawings Roberta J.M. Olson, ECLIPSE featured works of contemporary art by Lita Albuquerque, Russell Crotty, Stephen Dankner, Rosemarie Fiore, Michael C. McMillen and Jacqueline Woods, as well as historical paintings by Howard Russell Butler (1856-1934). It further included objects and artifacts borrowed or sourced from the Lick Observatory, The Huntington Library, the Museum of Jurassic Technology, Caltech Archives, JPL/NASA, Carnegie Observatories, and Goddard Space Flight Center.



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Exhibition: ECLIPSE (2017-18)

Anthony Misch, curator; Lick Observatory Historical Collections, Artifacts and Exhibition Film, 20th century; Courtesy of the University of California Observatories. Photo credit: Stephen Nowlin/ArtCenter College of Design.

Co-curated by Stephen Nowlin (Williamson Gallery Director/Curator), Jay Pasachoff (Field Memorial Professor of Astronomy at Williams College), and Anthony Misch (Director, Lick Observatory Historical Collections Project), in association with New-York Historical Society Curator of Drawings Roberta J.M. Olson, ECLIPSE featured works of contemporary art by Lita Albuquerque, Russell Crotty, Stephen Dankner, Rosemarie Fiore, Michael C. McMillen and Jacqueline Woods, as well as historical paintings by Howard Russell Butler (1856-1934). It further included objects and artifacts borrowed or sourced from the Lick Observatory, The Huntington Library, the Museum of Jurassic Technology, Caltech Archives, JPL/NASA, Carnegie Observatories, and Goddard Space Flight Center.



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Exhibition: ECLIPSE (2017-18)

Harper's Weekly Cover, August 24, 1878; Collection of Stephen Nowlin.

Co-curated by Stephen Nowlin (Williamson Gallery Director/Curator), Jay Pasachoff (Field Memorial Professor of Astronomy at Williams College), and Anthony Misch (Director, Lick Observatory Historical Collections Project), in association with New-York Historical Society Curator of Drawings Roberta J.M. Olson, ECLIPSE featured works of contemporary art by Lita Albuquerque, Russell Crotty, Stephen Dankner, Rosemarie Fiore, Michael C. McMillen and Jacqueline Woods, as well as historical paintings by Howard Russell Butler (1856-1934). It further included objects and artifacts borrowed or sourced from the Lick Observatory, The Huntington Library, the Museum of Jurassic Technology, Caltech Archives, JPL/NASA, Carnegie Observatories, and Goddard Space Flight Center.






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Exhibition: MOONS (2018)

Gallery View: Foreground; Tim Hawkinson, Thumbsucker, 2015, Mid: Sarah Perry, Impossible Gift, 2013, Background: Kevin M. Gill, Ten Moons, 2018, photo: Stephen Nowlin/ArtCenter

Curated by Stephen Nowlin. Artists and sources contributing to MOONS include Alternative Moons (Nadine Schlieper & Robert Pufleb), Carnegie Observatories, Caltech Archives, Kevin Gill, James Griffith, Tim Hawkinson, The Huntington Library, Melanie King, Sarah Perry, Steve Roden, Karley Sullivan, Penelope Umbrico, Mount Wilson Observatory and Jacqueline Woods. "Celestial bodies tethered by orbital physics to our solar system's planets, commonly known as moons, comprise a consortium of enticing worlds that are rocky, wet, icy, cratered, hot, cold, and puzzling, some of whose veneers are textured with mountains, lakes, concealed oceans, valleys, volcanoes, geysers, canyons and plains, and have both water and heat to fuel tantalizing speculations."



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Exhibition: MOONS (2018)

Gallery View: Foreground; Johannis Hevelii, Selenographia: A Description of the Movements of the Moon, 1647, Mid; Steve Roden, when stars become words (score), 2007, Background; Penelope Umbrico, Everyone's Moon 2015-11-04 14.22.59, 2015, photo: Stephen Nowlin/ArtCenter

Curated by Stephen Nowlin. Artists and sources contributing to MOONS include Alternative Moons (Nadine Schlieper & Robert Pufleb), Carnegie Observatories, Caltech Archives, Kevin Gill, James Griffith, Tim Hawkinson, The Huntington Library, Melanie King, Sarah Perry, Steve Roden, Karley Sullivan, Penelope Umbrico, Mount Wilson Observatory and Jacqueline Woods. "Celestial bodies tethered by orbital physics to our solar system's planets, commonly known as moons, comprise a consortium of enticing worlds that are rocky, wet, icy, cratered, hot, cold, and puzzling, some of whose veneers are textured with mountains, lakes, concealed oceans, valleys, volcanoes, geysers, canyons and plains, and have both water and heat to fuel tantalizing speculations."



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Exhibition: MOONS (2018)

Gallery Entry, photo: Stephen Nowlin/ArtCenter

Curated by Stephen Nowlin. Artists and sources contributing to MOONS include Alternative Moons (Nadine Schlieper & Robert Pufleb), Carnegie Observatories, Caltech Archives, Kevin Gill, James Griffith, Tim Hawkinson, The Huntington Library, Melanie King, Sarah Perry, Steve Roden, Karley Sullivan, Penelope Umbrico, Mount Wilson Observatory and Jacqueline Woods. "Celestial bodies tethered by orbital physics to our solar system's planets, commonly known as moons, comprise a consortium of enticing worlds that are rocky, wet, icy, cratered, hot, cold, and puzzling, some of whose veneers are textured with mountains, lakes, concealed oceans, valleys, volcanoes, geysers, canyons and plains, and have both water and heat to fuel tantalizing speculations."



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Exhibition: MOONS (2018)

Melanie King, Moon Rising, 2016, Digital video, projected; size variable, Courtesy of the artist, photo: Juan Posada/ArtCenter

Curated by Stephen Nowlin. Artists and sources contributing to MOONS include Alternative Moons (Nadine Schlieper & Robert Pufleb), Carnegie Observatories, Caltech Archives, Kevin Gill, James Griffith, Tim Hawkinson, The Huntington Library, Melanie King, Sarah Perry, Steve Roden, Karley Sullivan, Penelope Umbrico, Mount Wilson Observatory and Jacqueline Woods. "Celestial bodies tethered by orbital physics to our solar system's planets, commonly known as moons, comprise a consortium of enticing worlds that are rocky, wet, icy, cratered, hot, cold, and puzzling, some of whose veneers are textured with mountains, lakes, concealed oceans, valleys, volcanoes, geysers, canyons and plains, and have both water and heat to fuel tantalizing speculations."





Inquiries: williamson.gallery@artcenter.edu | More Info: HERE | See VIDEO of these Exhibitions HERE.